HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
October 3, 1943

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: The Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, dated 20 August 1943, Historical Records and
Histories of Organizations, the attached historical report for the period September 1-30 1943 is
submitted.








G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.

September 1-7, 1943.
Regiment in bivouac in vicinity of Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily. Usual garrison duties, training, with
some range firing.

September 8, 1943.
Regiment alerted in accordance with Division Defensive Plan due to surrender of Italy. Defensive
sectors occupied in accordance with attached overlay, dated September 9, 1943, and September 10,
1943 respectively.

September 9, 1943.
Occupation of defensive sectors continued without incident.

September 10, 1943.
Occupation of defensive sectors continued without incident.

September 11, 1943.
All organizations except Company and Company  returned to bivouac areas, vicinity of Palma di
Montechiaro, Sicily. Company  remained at Licata Airport, and Company  moved to Gela Airport,
where each organization took up guard duty and defensive sectors.

September 12, 1943.
Disposition unchanged. Units in bivouac continued training.

September 13, 1943.
Disposition unchanged.

September 14, 1943.
Regiment took over defense of portion of sector allotted 16th Infantry from 1st U.S. Infantry Division
Defensive Sector, per Training Circular No. 7, 1st U.S. Infantry Division, dated September 7, 1943,
with disposition as shown on attached overlay.

September 15, 1943.
Occupation of defensive sector continued without incident.

September 16-20, 1943.
No change.

September 21, 1943.
Command alerted for movement by water to unannounced destination. All units on guard duty
returned from designated areas to the bivouac area, vicinity of Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily.
Movement order cancelled later in day.

September 22-26, 1943.
Unit training continued in bivouac area near Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily, without incident.

September 27, 1943.
3rd Battalion, Cannon Company, 1/3 of Service Company and Headquarters Company move by
practice motor move to vicinity of Palermo, Sicily. Remainder of Regiment in bivouac, vicinity of
Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily, continuing unit training.

September 28, 1943.
Passes granted units, vicinity Palermo. Units at Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily continue training.
September 29, 1943.

Units in Palermo return to bivouac area by motor move.
September 30, 1943.

Unit training continued in bivouac area near Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily, without incident.
3 Incls; Overlays.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
December 1, 1943

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: The Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, dated 14 July 1943, the
following report is submitted.


OCTOBER 1-11, 1943.
Regiment in bivouac in vicinity of Palma di Montechiaro, Sicily. Usual camp duties, with training
schedule followed. Rainy season begins.

OCTOBER 12, 1943.
Regiment attends division demonstration in “Battalion in Attack.�

OCTOBER 13-14, 1943.
Plans made for movement by water.

OCTOBER 15, 1943.
Advance party (Ships staff), leaves for port of Augusta, Sicily to board ships.

OCTOBER 16-20, 1943.
Regiment packs for move.

OCTOBER 21, 1943.
First units move by motor from bivouac area to Augusta by motor convoy and begin boarding HMT
Maloja in harbor of Augusta.

OCTOBER 22, 1943.
All units of regiment, plus attached (7th F.A., 1st Med. Bn., and 1st Signal Co.) aboard. Day spent in
quartering troops and drawing up orders. Ship still in port.

OCTOBER 23, 1943.
Ship sails at 1210 hours. Training schedule carried out and boat drills held.

OCTOBER 24, 1943.
At sea. Training schedule followed.

OCTOBER 25, 1943.
Ship puts in at Algiers port. No one allowed ashore. All insignia and markings removed for security.

OCTOBER 26, 1943.
Still in port at Algiers. Training schedule followed.

OCTOBER 27, 1943.
Convoy sails at 1600 hours.

OCTOBER 28, 1943.
At sea. No change.

OCTOBER 29, 1943.
Pass Gibralter at 0200 hours. No change, and training schedule followed.

OCTOBER 30-31, 1943.
At sea. No change.






G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
December 4, 1943

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: The Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, dated 14 July 1943, the
following report is submitted.

November 1st - 4th
At sea aboard HMT MALOJA, trip without incident. Training schedule followed. Daily boat drills.

November 5th
Ship docks and units begin debarking at 2130.

November 6th
All units clear ship by 0615 hours, and move by trains to the following locations:
Headquarters Company  Beaminister
Anti-Tank Company - Beaminister
Cannon Company - Beaminister
Regimental Medical  Beaminister
Service Company  Bridport
2nd Battalion, less Companies E and G  Vicinity of Bridport
Companies E and G  Vicinity of Walditch
1st Battalion  Lyme Regis
Hq. Co. 3rd Bn. and Company I  Litton Cheney
Company K  Abottsbury
Company L- Long Bredy
Company M  Bexington
All of the above locations are in Dorsetshire, England.

November 7th - 13th
Time spent in setting up camp.

November 14th - 30th
Units in camp as stated above. Training schedule followed with Saturday afternoon and Sunday
holidays. Furloughs and passes granted.






G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
14 January 1944.

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, the following report is
submitted:

1 - 31 December
Organizations were garrisoned as follows:
Parnham, Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Hq. & Hq. Co., 16th Infantry / Regimental Medical Section, 16th Infantry.

Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Anti-Tank Company, 16th Infantry / Cannon Company, 16th Infantry

Lyme Regis, Dorset, England:
1st Battalion, 16th Infantry / 1st Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Bridport, Dorset, England:
Service Company, 16th Infantry / Hq. Co. 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company H, 16th Infantry
/ 2nd Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Walditch, Dorset, England:
Company G, 16th Infantry / Company E, 16th Infantry

West Bay, Dorset, England:
Company F, 16th Infantry

Litton Cheney, Dorset, England:
Hq. Co. 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company I, 16th Infantry / 3rd Battalion Medical Section,
16th Infantry

Long Bredy, Dorset, England:
Company L, 16th Infantry

Bexington, Dorset, England:
Company M, 16th Infantry

Abbotsbury, Dorset, England:
Company K, 16th Infantry

Training during the month included firing of the following weapons: M1, 03, BAR, Carbine, Pistol,
60 MM Mortar, 81 MM Mortar, Rocket Launcher, Hand Grenades, .30 Cal. MG, and .50 Cal. MG. At
least one platoon night problem per week, which has produced excellent results as regards control,
formation, and aggressiveness. Bayonet training has been emphasized. Gas Mask drill and training
in chemical warfare has been conducted weekly. Training films have been utilized.
The Anti-Tank Company, and Battalion Anti-Tank platoons have undergone an intensive schedule
culminated by four days firing on the range. There has been concentrated training in
communications and intelligence. All officers of the regiment have undergone a comprehensive
course in Military Justice. Recreation facilities were plentiful and utilized to the utmost. Christmas
holidays began Noon, 24 December, to Midnight, 26 December, and the New Years holidays began at
Noon, 31 December 1943. Morale good, food excellent.






G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
7 February 1944.

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, the following report is
submitted:

1 - 31 January
Organizations were garrisoned as follows:

Parnham, Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Hq. & Hq. Co., 16th Infantry / Regimental Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Anti-Tank Company, 16th Infantry / Cannon Company, 16th Infantry

Lyme Regis, Dorset, England:
1st Battalion, 16th Infantry / 1st Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Bridport, Dorset, England:
Service Company, 16th Infantry / Hq. Co. 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry /Company H, 16th Infantry
/ 2nd Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Walditch, Dorset, England:
Company G, 16th Infantry / Company E, 16th Infantry

West Bay, Dorset, England:
Company F, 16th Infantry

Litton Cheney, Dorset, England:
Hq. Co. 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company I, 16th Infantry / 3rd Battalion Medical Section,
16th Infantry

Long Bredy, Dorset, England:
Company L, 16th Infantry

Bexington, Dorset, England:
Company M, 16th Infantry

Abbotsbury, Dorset, England:
Company K, 16th Infantry

Regiment training consisted of range firing of the following weapons: M1, 03, BAR, Carbine, Pistol, 60
MM Mortar and 81 MM Mortar, rocket launcher, hand grenades, 30 calibre and 50 calibre machine
guns. Emphasis was also placed on bayonet training, gas mask drill, and night problems. Platoons
practiced assaulting fortified positions and street fighting. Weekly training was carried on in
chemical warfare. Training films were utilized extensively.
The Cannon Company fired on the artillery range in Wales from January 3 to January 9. Battalion
marches and physical exercises were emphasized more than in previous months. Battalion staffs
conducted Command Post Exercises, and plans calling for a Regimental Command Post Exercise
during the first week of February were completed.
Intensive training of all communications and Intelligence personnel was emphasized.
Part of Regimental Headquarters Company and the Regimental Medical Detachment worked a night
problem January 21, 1944.

General Montgomery addressed the assembled regiment at the Bridport Cricket Grounds, Sunday,
January 16, 1944.




G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
4 March, 1944.

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, the following report is
submitted:

1 - 8 and 26 - 29 February
Organizations were garrisoned as follows:

Parnham, Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Hq. & Hq. Co., 16th Infantry / Regimental Medical Section, 16th Infantry.

Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Anti-Tank Company, 16th Infantry / Cannon Company, 16th Infantry

Lyme Regis, Dorset, England:
1st Battalion, 16th Infantry / 1st Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Bridport, Dorset, England:
Service Company, 16th Infantry / Hq. Co. 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company H, 16th Infantry
/ 2nd Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Walditch, Dorset, England:
Company G, 16th Infantry / Company E, 16th Infantry

West Bay, Dorset, England:
Company F, 16th Infantry

Litton Cheney, Dorset, England:
Hq. Co. 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company I, 16th Infantry / 3rd Battalion Medical Section,
16th Infantry

Long Bredy, Dorset, England:
Company L, 16th Infantry

Bexington, Dorset, England:
Company M, 16th Infantry

Abbotsbury, Dorset, England:
Company K, 16th Infantry

The training during the first week was similar to that participated in during January, in which
emphasis was placed on night problems, attack on fortifications, hikes, lectures and calisthenics. A
Regimental Command Post Exercise was conducted the 4th of February in which communications
and coordination of Battalion and Regimental Staffs were emphasized.
On February 8th, the entire Combat Team moved to Braunton, County of Devon, where, for the
following two weeks, intensive training was undergone in assault of fortified positions and beachhead
landings, at the U.S. Assault Training Center. Specialized training consisting of use of flame throwers
and demolitions, individual and team assault, minefield technique, hedgehog, and battalion and
regimental landings. The entire Combat Team concluded the training on the 24th of February when
they participated in a Combat Team landing exercise.
The Regiment returned to its old area February 26th and the remainder of the months training was
similar to that conducted previously to Braunton exercise.






G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
8 April 1944.

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
1. In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, the following report is
submitted:

1 - 6, 7 - 21, and 13 - 31 March
Organizations were garrisoned as follows:

Parnham, Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Hq. & Hq. Co., 16th Infantry / Regimental Medical Section, 16th Infantry.

Beaminister, Dorset, England:
Anti-Tank Company, 16th Infantry / Cannon Company, 16th Infantry

Lyme Regis, Dorset, England:
1st Battalion, 16th Infantry / 1st Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Bridport, Dorset, England:
Service Company, 16th Infantry / Hq. Co. 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company H, 16th Infantry
/ 2nd Battalion Medical Section, 16th Infantry

Walditch, Dorset, England:
Company G, 16th Infantry / Company E, 16th Infantry

West Bay, Dorset, England:
Company F, 16th Infantry

Litton Cheney, Dorset, England:
Hq. Co. 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry / Company I, 16th Infantry / 3rd Battalion Medical Section,
16th Infantry

Long Bredy, Dorset, England:
Company L, 16th Infantry

Bexington, Dorset, England:
Company M, 16th Infantry

Abbotsbury, Dorset, England:
Company K, 16th Infantry

2. During period March 1st through 6th the regular training schedule was followed with emphasis
placed on hikes, problems, lectures, and calisthenics. Units were allowed no passes or furloughs after
the 2nd.
On March 7th, the entire Combat Team made preparation for boat landing maneuvers in the Slapton
Sands area.
The advance detail moved out at 0400 hours, the remainder of the regiment following at 0630 hours
on March 8th. Advance detail boarded the U.S.S. BARNETT in Weymouth harbor at 0930 hours. The
balance of the regiment and combat team arrived in Weymouth and boarded the troopships at 1145
hours.
During the next two days, March 9th and 10th, troops on board ship were given final instructions
pertaining to the landing. Landing assault began at 0830 hours, March 11th with assault units
hitting the beach.
The problem got well under way with all units landing on schedule and the town of Strete being taken
in order.
At 1245 hours, Sunday, March 12th the troops were on their final objective and dug in, after which
the problem ended. The men then moved to an assembly area where they received a hot meal and
boarded trains to move back to old areas.
After returning to our area the regiment followed a training schedule very similar to that conducted
previous to the boat landing exercise with the exception that range firing was included. Recreation
such as movies, shows, dances, passes, and furloughs were afforded the troops.






G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
HEADQUARTERS 16TH INFANTRY
Office of the Regimental Commander
APO # 1, U.S. Army,
9 July 1944

SUBJECT: Historical Records.

TO: Commanding General, 1st U.S. Infantry Division.
In compliance with letter, Allied Force Headquarters, subject as above, the following report is
submitted.

1-4 June 1944
CT 16 and attachments moved from D area camps in the vicinity of Dorchester, Dorset, England, to
load aboard ships at Weymouth and Portland, England, with various small detachments loading at
other points.

5 June 1944
Final preparations for sailing completed. The convoy sailed the evening of 5 June for the invasion of
France.

6 June 1944
At approximately 0345 hours, the 2nd Bn and 3rd Bn debarked from the USS Henrico and the HMS
Empire Anvil, respectively, to assault Beach OMAHA, north of Colleville sur Mer, Normandie,
France, at 0630 hours. Heavy seas, numerous underwater obstacles, and intense enemy fire
destroyed many craft and caused high casualties even before the assault battalions reached shore.
Most supporting weapons, including DD tanks, were swamped. The 2nd Bn., landing from one
hundred to one thousand yards from its scheduled points, were pinned down on the beach by
extremely heavy fire from concrete fortifications, machine gun emplacements, and sniper nests,
which remained intact through severe naval and air bombardment. Casualties were extremely high.
The 3rd Bn. landed on the left of Beach OMAHA in the vicinity of Beach Exit E2 and despite heavy
fire, fought inland up the E3 draw and destroyed many enemy beach fortifications in its sector.
The 1st Bn. landed on the same beach on which troops of the 2nd Bn. and supporting organizations
were pinned down, as the reserve battalion, at approximately 0730 hours.
This caused severe intermingling and confusion on the already crowded beach. Reorganization was
accomplished under continued heavy fire. Much equipment was lost and casualties mounted. One
group had blown a gap in the wire and started moving inland through the minefields to take the ridge
line overlooking the beach.
The 1st and 2nd Bns. cleared Colleville sur Mer and by 1100 hours, a general movement inland was
underway, meeting stubborn resistance.
By night, the 1st and 2nd Bns. had reached positions about 1500 yards to the West and North of
Colleville sur Mer, where they dug in and repulsed enemy counter attacks during the evening and
night.
The 3rd Bn. seized le Grand Hamel and moved eastward along the ridges toward Port en Bessin,
digging in during the night and consolidating their position.

7 June 1944
The advance continued, with other elements of the Division passing through CT 16, leaving the
Regiment to mop up isolated enemy strong points and snipers. Patrols encountered many of these
strong points and snipers. Contact was maintained with the British on the left and other elements of
the Division to the south and on the right.

8 June 1944
The advance continued with CT 16 in Division reserve. Continuous combat patrolling throughout the
day and night cleared out strong points and snipers left or by-passed by the forward units, casualties
were light, and some prisoners were taken. Contact was gained and kept with units on both flanks.

9 June 1944
Regiment in support still following other units of the division, cleaning out strong points and snipers
by-passed. Patrols cleared town of Mosles and other patrols cleared Vancelles and maintained contact
with the British on our left.

10 June 1944
The regiment, in Division reserve, moved to an assembly point as shown on S-3 Periodic Report # 4.
An all around defense was established, and contact by patrol was maintained with forward elements
of the Division and with British units on our left.

11 June 1944
Regiment still in a defensive position in Division reserve contact by patrol maintained.

12 June 1944
The regiment moved to a forward position, (see S-3 Periodic Report # 6) and prepared, as Division
reserve, to support or take over the mission of either of the combat teams of the Division.

13 June 1944
The regiment was placed in a secondary defensive position to repel counter attacks from either flank
or the front, or to take over either of the missions of the other combat teams of the Division. The I and
R platoon patrolled extensively during the period to the flanks.

14 June 1944
Regiment, still in Division reserve, occupied a defensive position of secondary defense. Co. A., 16th
Infantry, was placed under Division control and took a defensive position in the vicinity of the
Division CP to prevent possible infiltration from the left flank of the Division.





G.A. TAYLOR
Colonel, 16th Infantry
Commanding.
George Arthur Taylor was born 14 February 1899 in Illinois. He became a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point on 13 June 1922. His career
during the inter war years could be characterized as an unusually long string of infantry assignments beginning with the 23rd Infantry at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. He
would then serve with the 35th Infantry in Hawaii from 1924-27, the 4th Infantry in Fort Lawton, Washington and Fort Abraham Lincoln in North Dakota from 1927-28, the
30th Infantry Presidio in San Francisco, California from 1928-33, the 38th Infantry in Fort Douglas, Utah from 1934-37, finally taking a break from troop duty when he
attended the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth from 1937-38. He returned to more infantry assignments with the Filipino Scout unit of the 57th
Infantry Regiment at Fort William McKinley, then as the Intelligence Officer of the 1st Battalion 16th Infantry from November 1940 to June 1941. He became the assistant
chief of staff of the Caribbean Force from June-July of 1941. After that went on to instruct tactics at the Infantry School in Fort Benning, Georgia from July 1941 to August
1942. He then became assigned to the North African Theater of Operations from August 1942 to January 1943 initially as a staff member for the Advanced Echelon
Amphibious Forces, Atlantic Fleet and in October the a staff member to the Naval Operating Base Commander in Oran. In February 1943, he took brief command of the
26th Infantry Regiment in North Africa. On 20 April 1943, he took command of the 16th Infantry Regiment replacing Col. Frechet where he would remain for the most of
the war until he was promoted to Brigadier General in 1944 and assigned as the assistant division commander of the 4th Infantry Division and eventually returning to the
1st Division as its assistant division commander.
As commander of the 16th Infantry Regiment, he would lead his men to drive Rommel out of North Africa, to the amphibious assault on the Gulf of Gela in the invasion of
Sicily including facing the Hermann Goring Division in a desperate tank battle. His finest moment of the war came at Easy Red of Omaha Beach in Normandy, where the
1st Division was bogged down by intense machine gun and artillery fire by fortified positions of bunkers of battle-hardened German 352nd Division. Sometime around
0800 on June 6, 1944 the 47 year old Col. Taylor arrived on an LCM with the second wave of Combat Team 16 command post. While the craft came under heavy enemy
machine and mortar fire on the way in, he was relatively unharassed while he waded ashore in waist deep water. Col. Taylor was able to observe that the entire
assaulting element was pinned down on the beach in stake of disorganized chaos following the death of the Executive Officer Lt. Col. Matthews along with the Supply
Officer Major Godfrey. He immediately gathered what remained of his company and battalion commanders at the forward CP on the beach and ordered them to lead their
men off the beach that had become a kill zone under constant enemy fire. When Lt. Spauldings section from Company E was able to penetrate the German coastal defenses, Col. Taylor rallied his troops to Exit E-1 by
uttering one of the most famous lines of the war, There are only two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are dead and those who are going to die. Now lets get the hell out of here!
Under the command of Col. Taylor CT 16 advanced 300 yards inland, where over the next 24 hours he was able to consolidate his position and repel German counterattacks, successfully securing a beach head on
Omaha.
He continued to fight with the 16th Infantry in France, until he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and replaced Frederick Gibb as the assistant division commander of the 4th Infantry Division. He would
campaign from Paris, to the capture of Remagen Bridge, to the Harz Mountains and the Elbe River. He returned to the 1st division in October of 1944 as its assistant division commander. His career culminated, when
he accepted the surrender of 70,000 German soldiers in the city of Elbogen, Sudetenland, which he changed back to its name before the Nazi invasion in official papers to Loket, Czechoslovakia earning the respect of
the Czech people. He retired in 1946 from war related disabilities. He died at the age of 70 on 3 December 1969 in Palo Alto, California as a result from a prolonged illness caused by a stroke in 1960

U. S. Army Historical Division, interview June 21 1944:
Col. Taylor came in with the Rear Cp with the essential regimental staff and personnel. The rest was with Lt. Col. John Matthews [X), 16th Infantry]. The coxswain went into Exit E-3 and was fired on. Col. Taylor had the
coxswain pull out and get in at a more favorable spot. The tide was one-half in. [Taylors group was] fired on while wading up to their necks. It was a helpless feeling wading while shot at,  [said Taylor]. The shore
battalion and engineers were behind the [shingle] and there was little firing from our troops. There was a state of confusion. The troops there lined up on the beach like cons in a store room. There was nothing official
from anybody. All were interested in holding-in and keeping out of the fire. Taylor move to Exit E-3 and found that [Matthews Advanced CP] had been hit. The men were intermingled on the beach. They couldn't get
anywhere until we stopped the fire from the strongpoints.
Balkoski, Jospeph, Omaha Beach:
D-Day June 6, 1944, p. 198.

Personal Account of Pvt. Warren Rulien and Pvt. Rual Radzam:
He [Col. Taylor] stopped across the sandbar and bullets began hitting the ware around him. He laid down on this stomach and started crawling toward shore, his staff officers doing the same. He has a couple of
tattered-ass second louies following him. They looked like they were scared to death. When Taylor made it to the seawall, he told the other officers, ˜
If were going to die, lets die up there". To the other groups of men,
Taylor said, ˜
There are only two kinds of people on this beach: the dead and those about to die: So lets get the hell out of here."
-Ambrose, Stephen E., D-Day June 6 1944:

Personal Account of Donal Scribner:
Sgt. William Lindsay was in a concrete pillbox when it received two direct hits from 5-inch shells. He lost a tooth and was knocked silly by the concussion. Three times during the day he had to be stopped by fellow
rangers from walking off the cliff. That evening, he confronted Colonel Taylor of the 16th. Red-faced, cursing, he accused Taylor of stealing his rifle. All the while he had the rifle slung over his shoulder. This gave the
rangers who saw it a laugh
Brig. General Taylor assumes the position of
First Division Assistant Commander in
Feb. 1945 in Belgium.
Col. George Taylor Distinguished Service Cross
Citation, June 14, 1944:

Col. George A. Taylor, in command of the 16th RCT,
landed during the most crucial, threatening period
of the operation. Thousands of leaderless men lay
huddled on the seven-yard beachhead, their
organization disastrously cut down by fire. The
exists were blocked, supporting weapons had not
or could not be landed or were already destroyed,
and the attack was arrested. Without hesitation,
unmindful of the snipers and machine gun fire
directed at him, Taylor moved up and own the
beach, continuously exposing himself to
murderous fire. He found officers and gather
groups of men together for them to lead. He found,
led, and drove men into the action. Calmly and
coolly he assigned objectives to these newly
organized groups. He converted a bewildered mob
into a coordinated fighting force.
14 June 1944.

-Balkoski, Jospeph, Omaha Beach:
D-Day June 6, 1944, p. 199.